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e-Review Florida United Methodist News Service
      
 

e-Review Photo Gallery
April-August 2010
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Children get ready to eat lunch at Rogers Memorial United Methodist Church in Bradenton. The church served as a Summer Food Service Program site in 2009, helping fill the gap for school children during the summer when they wouldn’t get the benefit of a school lunch. Photo by Derek Maul. Photo #09-1280. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1062, 08/6/09. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1202, 07/24/10.








Suzie Asa shares details about a partnership between churches in her community to help youth participate in the summer meal program at the local high school with members attending Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week at the state capitol. Asa is director of children and family ministries at Keystone United Methodist Church in Keystone Heights. About 75 Methodists from the Florida Conference and African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District, gathered in Tallahassee April 11-13 to learn about legislation affecting children and families and meet with legislators to urge them to support specific actions on bills being considered. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1520. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1202, 07/24/10.


Madame Paul gives a medicine-sized cup portion of strawberry soda to some of the 97 children she and three other women care for in a house Paul rents. It is one of several orphanages a group of Florida Conference leaders visited during a trip to Haiti in February that hopes to become part of the Global Orphan Project network, which helps build communities that sustain orphans around the world. Photo by Vee Stepelton. Photo #10-1457. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1201, 07/24/10.







Paulette West tells laity and clergy attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event about the experience of a non-Florida mission team that chartered a plane to Haiti soon after the earthquake Jan. 12 to assist with recovery efforts, without notifying anyone of its plans. The team was not allowed to enter Haiti and required assistance from UMCOR representatives to return home. West, who serves as executive director of United Methodist Volunteers in Mission, Southeastern Jurisdiction, shared the story to emphasize the importance of working through established aid channels to help the Haitian people. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1519. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1201, 07/24/10.


The Rev. Beth Fogle-Miller urges laity and clergy attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event not to become what she calls “disaster cowboys” — people who are so eager to help the people of Haiti recover from the earthquake Jan. 12 that they don’t go through established aid channels. Fogle-Miller is director of Florida Conference Connectional Ministries. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1518. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1201, 07/24/10.


The Rev. Jack Jackson (center), pastor at Christ United Methodist Church in Lakeland, visits with the Rev. Steve Gober (left), president of the main seminary in Costa Rica, and Bishop Luis Palomo of the Iglesia Evangelica Metodista de Costa Rica, the primary Methodist denomination in Costa Rica. Jackson spoke at the Methodist church's annual Pastor’s School in April. Photo courtesy of Jack Jackson. Photo #10-1517. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1200, 07/23/10.





Jessica Neely (right), a member at Grace United Methodist Church in Ft. Myers, tells Florida Conference laity and clergy that her church “egged” neighbors in the community surrounding the church. It was part of an Easter outreach in which the church delivered eggs filled with candy as a way of inviting residents to church. Neely and the Rev. Joretha Capers (left), pastor at Ebenezer United Methodist Church in Miami, were part of a panel of conference clergy and laity that shared what their churches are doing to help members mature as disciples and reach out to their communities during the Center for Congregational Excellence report at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event in June. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1516. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1199, 07/21/10.


With the title “A Disciple is a Follower of Jesus Christ for Life,” members consider a handout describing the phases of growth as a disciple during a report of the Center for Congregational Excellence at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event in June. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1515. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1199, 07/21/10.










Laity and clergy members discuss the definition of a church member versus a disciple during a report of the Center for Congregational Excellence at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event in June. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1514. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1199, 07/21/10.







Laney Burney (right) instructs a participant attending a fingerweaving class during the Florida Conference Committee on Native American Ministry annual retreat May 14-16. Burney learned the art of fingerweaving while delving deeper into her Creek heritage and participating in Native American re-enactments depicting early 1880s camp life. Photo by J.A. Buchholz. Photo #10-1513. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1198, 07/15/10.


Felip McMakin practices the art of fingerweaving at the Committee on Native American Ministry (CONAM) annual retreat May 14-16. She said the weekend helped her learn ways to incorporate her Cherokee heritage into her American day-to-day living. Photo by J.A. Buchholz. Photo #10-1512. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1198, 07/15/10.


Kaltouma Zakaria Moussa relaxes beneath a new mosquito net provided by the Nothing But Nets campaign at her home in a camp near Goz Beida, Chad. A UMNS file photo by Mike DuBose. Photo #10-1398. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1136, 02/04/10. Also  accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1196, 07/12/10.





“Five children died during this video,” the Rev. Audrey Warren tells members attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event after they watched an informational video about The United Methodist Church’s “Imagine No Malaria” initiative. One child dies of malaria every 30 seconds, according to the video. Warren is leading the conference’s task force for the initiative and shared details about the campaign with lay and clergy members of the conference June 11. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1511. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1196, 07/12/10.


Participants attending the recent “A Sustainable Faith: Justice in the Real World” conference at The Missio Dei Community at Albright United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg take part in a responsive prayer. Photo by Derek Maul. Photo #10-1510. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1195, 07/08/10.










Members of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers share their stories fighting for fair wages and safe working conditions for farm workers with participants at the recent “A Sustainable Faith: Justice in the Real World” conference. As late as 2008 there were cases of farm workers locked in box trucks and released only to work. Many workers in Florida’s tomato fields earn pennies per 32-pound bucket picked. In 1978 workers earned just 40 cents per bucket. Today, the rate is 72 cents. The Missio Dei Community, an interdenominational congregation housed at Albright United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg, helped sponsor the conference. Photo by Derek Maul. Photo #10-1509. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1195, 07/08/10.


“Missio Dei doesn’t have a mission,” says the Rev. Joe Esposito, co-pastor of The Missio Dei Community. “It is mission.” Missio Dei is an emergent, interdenominational congregation housed at Albright United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg. It helped sponsor the recent “A Sustainable Faith: Justice in the Real World” conference, held at the St. Petersburg church. Photo by Derek Maul. Photo #10-1508. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1195, 07/08/10.









Keynote speaker Shane Claiborne tells participants at the “A Sustainable Faith: Justice in the Real World” conference that eradicating poverty is only possible when “we first are willing to make poverty personal.” “We can’t be a voice for the voiceless without listening to their voices,” he said. Claiborne is author of “The Irresistible Revolution” and a speaker who shares his experience practicing the principles he intones while living in a poor neighborhood in Philadelphia. The Missio Dei Community, an interdenominational congregation housed at Albright United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg, helped sponsor the conference. Photo by Derek Maul. Photo #10-1507. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1195, 07/08/10.


Thousands of paper cut-out and painted hand prints made by children from across Florida hang in the Florida Capitol rotunda during Children’s Week, a weeklong annual advocacy event designed to raise awareness about children’s issues that coincides with the state’s spring legislative session. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1506. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.








Children from a Tallahassee school sing on the steps of the Florida Capitol April 13 to kick off a press conference during Children’s Week, a weeklong annual advocacy event designed to raise awareness about children’s issues that coincides with the state’s spring legislative session. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1505. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.










Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker concludes a meeting with Republican Sen. Durell Peaden from Crestview April 13 during Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week. The meeting was one of more than a dozen Florida Methodists had with legislators to urge them to support bills that would help Florida children and families struggling with food and housing issues. About 75 Methodists participated in the annual advocacy event to learn about key issues affecting children and families before meeting with legislators. The event is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1504. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.


Florida Methodists march to the state capitol April 13 to meet with legislators and urge them to support bills that would help Florida children and families struggling with food and housing issues. The meetings were part of Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week April 11-13 during the state’s spring legislative session. The annual event is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1503. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.








“There is every possibility, like 98 percent, that the cap bill will be passed,” Mark Hendrickson tells about 75 Florida Methodists attending Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week April 11-13. Hendrickson, a board member with the Florida Housing Coalition, was referring to bills calling for the repeal of a cap on money going to a state trust fund for affordable housing. By the end of the legislative session, the bills had unexpectedly not made it to the floor for a vote, effectively killing them. During the annual event, members learn about key issues affecting children and families in preparation for visits with state legislators. The event is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1502. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.


Florida Methodists attending Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week April 11-13 take notes on key issues affecting children and families in preparation for visits with state legislators the next day. The annual event, held during the state’s spring legislative session, is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1501. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.








Debra Susie, executive director of Tallahassee-based advocacy group Florida Impact, gives about 75 Florida Methodists specific instructions on what to say to legislators when meeting with them the next day. Susie’s comments were part of the training portion of Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week April 11-13 during the state’s spring legislative session. During the annual event, members learn about key issues affecting children and families in preparation for visits with state legislators. The event is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1500. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.


The Revs. Ken Hamilton and Pam Cahoon encourage the Rev. Freddie Tellis to vote for legislation supporting children and families in a role-play simulating a visit with a state legislator. It was part of Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week April 11-13 during the state’s spring legislative session. About 75 Florida Methodists met to learn about key issues affecting children and families in preparation for visits with state legislators. The annual event is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Hamilton is pastor at Tallahassee Heights United Methodist Church in Tallahassee, Cahoon is director of C.R.O.S. Ministries (Christians Reaching Out to Society) in Lake Worth, and Tellis is pastor at Mt. Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church in Havana. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1499. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.


Members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District (front row), wait for a press conference of key leaders advocating for children’s issues at the state capitol in Tallahassee to begin. Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker was one of the speakers, dedicating thousands of paper cut-out and painted hand prints made by children from across the state that were hung in the capitol’s rotunda. The women’s visit to the capitol was part of Florida Advocacy Days at Children’s Week April 11-13 during the state’s spring legislative session. The annual event is a joint effort between United Way of Florida, Florida Impact, Florida Conference Justice and Outreach Ministries, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th Episcopal District. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1498. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1193, 07/06/10.




Lynnette Fields challenges members attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 11 to do their part to make the modern-day miracle of ending childhood hunger in Florida a reality. Fields is executive director of servant ministries at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando and the Florida Conference’s representative to the Partnership to End Childhood Hunger, comprised of more than 50 organizations throughout the state that are implementing a multi-year, strategic 10-point plan to end childhood hunger in Florida in 10 years. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1497. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1192, 07/01/10.


“One out of every four children in our state is hungry,” the Rev. Pam Cahoon tells members attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 11. “People are dying — dying in every one of our communities What would Jesus have us do? We know what Jesus did. Do something. We can do it.” Cahoon is director of C.R.O.S. (Christians Reaching Out To Society) in Lake Worth and a leader in organizing Florida Conference United Methodists to support the conference’s social witness mission to end childhood hunger and poverty in Florida. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1496. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1192, 07/01/10.


Stan Doerr, president and chief executive officer of ECHO (Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization), shows Florida Conference district superintendents and other leaders how aluminum cans are used in place of soil as an anchor for the roots of the plant. It is an example of the “urban gardening” being implemented at ECHO. The December 2009 trip to ECHO was part of Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker’s annual fall retreat with conference leaders. File photo by Erik J. Alsgaard. Photo #10-1373. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1126, 01/21/10. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1192, 07/01/10.


Stan Doerr tells members attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 11 that he never wants a child to die of hunger because he doesn’t have the resources to help. As president and chief executive officer of ECHO (Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization) in Ft. Myers, he does. ECHO works with more than 3,000 organizations in 180 countries, Doerr said, to provide the tools missionaries and indigenous people need to address hunger locally. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1495. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1192, 07/01/10.



Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker (front right), Lakeland Mayor Gow Fields (left) and other conference leaders cut the ribbon June 12 at the consecration ceremony for the new Florida United Methodist Center in downtown Lakeland. Photo by Alain Boniec. Photo #10-1494. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1191, 06/29/10.


The new Florida United Methodist Center is located at 450 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Lakeland, FL 33815-1522. Photo by Frank North. Photo #10-1493. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1191, 06/29/10.






Members share a phrase or word that meant something in particular to them from the passage the Rev. Juanita Rasmus read during her Bible study June 11 at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Rasmus is co-pastor at St. John’s Downtown United Methodist Church in Houston, Texas. Photo by Linda Beavers. Photo #10-1492. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1190, 06/28/10.






The Rev. Jaunita Rasmus teaches the Lectio Divina or “divine reading” — a spiritual practice begun centuries ago to teach scripture and increase communion with God — to help laity and clergy learn how to “make space and time” for God. Rasmus, co-pastor at St. John’s Downtown United Methodist Church in Houston, Texas, was the Bible study leader during the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10-12. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1491. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1190, 06/28/10.


Brigitte Gynther, with the Rev. David Berkey, asks members who just watched the film series “Reality of Poverty in the U.S. and World Shared on Film” June 9 at the Lakeland Center to take the unfair practices many farm workers endure into consideration when making food purchases and put pressure on large grocery chains to buy only from farms that provide safe working conditions and fair wages. Gynther works with Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida. Berkey is executive director of the conference’s camps and retreat ministries and facilitator of the film showing and discussion. The session and eight classes were offered a day before the official start of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1490. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1189, 06/25/10.


What's that tomato or coffee bean worth? Members find out watching “Reality of Poverty in the U.S. and World Shared on Film” shown June 9 at the Lakeland Center. The film series shared the abusive and unsafe working conditions some Florida farm workers face and unfair pricing affecting the livelihoods of Ethiopian coffee farmers. It and eight classes were offered a day before the official start of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event to help clergy and laity prepare for discussions during the annual session and provide information to help members be more effective in their local church ministries. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1489. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1189, 06/25/10.




The Rev. Catherine Fluck-Price prays with a layperson at the service of licensing, commissioning and ordination June 11 during the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Nearly 30 people accepted Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker’s invitation to individuals considering a call to ministry to join him, Fluck-Price or the Rev. David Dodge, executive director of the conference Center for Clergy Excellence, at the front of the Lakeland Center arena for a moment of prayer. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1488. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1188, 06/23/10.


The Rev. David Allen is ordained an elder June 11 during the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event in Lakeland. He was one of 26 men and 18 women licensed, commissioned and ordained during the evening service at the Lakeland Center. The average age of the 18 candidates ordained elder and deacon was 44. Photo by Linda Beavers. Photo #10-1487. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1188, 06/23/10.






Candidates to be commissioned provisional elders and deacons stand while lay and clergy members and guests respond affirmatively when asked by Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker if they trust the candidates “are called by God’s grace to be commissioned” and will “uphold” the candidates in their ministry. The candidates were among the 26 men and 18 women licensed, commissioned and ordained June 11 at the Lakeland Center during the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1486. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1188, 06/23/10.


Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker tells candidates preparing to be ordained elder they have a responsibility in “duly administering” the sacrament of communion. That means looking around to see who is — and who is not — at the table. “The sacrament is not duly administered,” he said, “until the table looks like the community.” Twenty-six men and 18 women were licensed, commissioned and ordained June 11 at the Lakeland Center during the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1485. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1188, 06/23/10.


A candle is lit as the name of a loved one is read at the memorial service for clergy and clergy spouses who died during the past conference year. A candle was lit for each of the 48 people remembered. The service was held June 10 at the 2010 Florida Annual Event in Lakeland. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1484. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1187, 06/22/10.







The Rev. Dr. Larry Rankin challenges lay and clergy members and guests to continue the legacy of clergy and clergy spouses who died during the past conference year. “Legacy bears fruit,” Rankin said at the memorial service June 10 during the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. “The body of Christ of the saints continues with us today. This is why Christian ministry thrives — because of this unbroken line of splendor for over 2,000 years. And it has no end.” Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1483. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1187, 06/22/10.


Lay and clergy members attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Even take a vote June 11 during the report on the conference’s finances, pension and health benefits, and property insurance programs. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1482.Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1186, 06/18/10.





The Rev. David Harris, senior pastor at Estero United Methodist Church, gets his blood pressure checked at the health fair offered two days of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event in Lakeland June 10-12. It’s part of a conference emphasis to encourage clergy to adopt healthier lifestyles so they can be more effective in ministry. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1481. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1186, 06/18/10.


With the theme song from “Indiana Jones” in the background and a montage of well-known clips of movie characters celebrating victories, Mickey Wilson told nearly 1,800 lay and clergy members attending the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event that “although we aren’t fully recovered, things are getting better — much better.” Wilson is treasurer and director of administrative services for the conference. He made that assessment for a promising financial outlook June 11 in his report from the Conference Council on Finance and Administration. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1480. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1186, 06/18/10.|


A member prays after being invited by Bishop Peter Weaver to “come to the Lord’s Supper, where he might eradicate our poverty of spirit so we might be one with Christ in the mission of eradicating extreme poverty for the world.” Weaver is bishop of the New England Annual Conference and was guest preacher at the communion service, held June 10 during this year’s Florida Annual Conference Event. The nearly three-day annual gathering convened under the theme “Transforming the World by Eradicating Extreme Poverty.” Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1479. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1185, 06/16/10.



Members take communion after Bishop Peter Weaver tells them the “gates on our consciousness” must be unlocked so attitudes toward the poor can be broadened and those who are materially blessed can have meaningful relationships with those who are not. Only when this poverty of relationships and spirits is restored, he said, can there be an end to poverty. Weaver is bishop of the New England Annual Conference and was guest preacher at the communion service, held June 10 during this year’s Florida Annual Conference Event. The nearly three-day annual gathering convened under the theme “Transforming the World by Eradicating Extreme Poverty.” Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1478. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1185, 06/16/10.


Members attending the communion service June 10 at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event get ready for worship through the music of the praise band from McCabe United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg before guest preacher Bishop Peter Weaver of the New England Annual Conference shares the evening’s message. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1477. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1185, 06/16/10.








Bishop Peter Weaver asks laity and clergy attending the communion service June 10 at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event to snap their fingers every second. Speaking in time to the beat of their snapping, he said it takes only a matter of seconds for a child to die of preventable causes (estimates vary from three to 60 depending on the cause). But it’s “not about the beat,” Weaver said. “It’s about the hearts of children that stop beating.” Weaver is bishop of the New England Annual Conference and was guest preacher at the service. The theme of the nearly three-day annual gathering was “Transforming the World by Eradicating Extreme Poverty.” Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1476. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1185, 06/16/10.






Lay and clergy members attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10 take a step forward in the fight to end global hunger by writing letters to their House representatives, asking them to urge Congress to fully fund the federal international affairs budget, which provides funding for hunger-, poverty- and disease-prevention programs abroad. The letter writing campaign took place during the Rev. David Beckmann’s remarks on efforts to eliminate extreme poverty around the world. Beckmann is president of Bread for the World, a hunger relief group that works with churches and other organizations to help people advocate for an end to policies and programs that perpetuate hunger.” Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1475. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1184, 06/15/10.


Speaking to lay and clergy members attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10, the Rev. David Beckmann said eradicating extreme poverty really is possible, through faith-based, bipartisan political advocacy efforts. During the last three to four decades, they’ve resulted in 500 million fewer people living in poverty and 21,000 fewer children dying daily from preventable causes. “The remaining carnage (children’s deaths) is a damn scandal,” he said. “But the changes we’ve seen in recent decades is a miracle.” Beckmann is president of Bread for The World, a hunger relief group that works with churches and other organizations to help people advocate for an end to policies and programs that perpetuate hunger. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1474. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1184, 06/15/10.


The Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, answers questions about the organization’s work and extreme hunger in the world from lay and clergy members attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10. When asked if Bread for the World encounters any opposition, Beckmann said only that the comment is always “everything else is so important.” “What that translates to,” he said, “is that everything else is more important than hungry kids.” The nearly three-day annual business session convened under the theme “Transforming the World by Eradicating Extreme.” Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1473. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1183, 06/15/10.







Ushers and conference staff collect letters lay and clergy members attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10 have written to their representatives asking them to urge Congress to fully fund the federal international affairs budget, which provides funding for hunger-, poverty- and disease-prevention programs abroad. The letter writing campaign took place during the Rev. David Beckmann’s remarks on efforts to eliminate extreme poverty around the world. The letters were collected and then taken to the altar to be blessed. Beckmann is president of Bread for the World, which helps churches, individuals and organizations organize to change policies, programs and conditions that enable hunger to continue. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1472. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1183, 06/15/10.


A member attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10 writes a personal letter that will accompany a sample letter to her representative asking that Congress fully fund the federal international affairs budget, which provides funding for hunger-, poverty- and disease-prevention programs abroad. The letter writing campaign took place during the Rev. David Beckmann’s remarks on efforts to eliminate extreme poverty around the world. Beckmann is president of Bread for the World, which helps churches, individuals and organizations organize to change policies, programs and conditions that enable hunger to continue. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1471. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1183, 06/15/10.





Lay and clergy members attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10 address sample letters to their House representatives, asking them to urge Congress to fully fund the federal international affairs budget, which provides funding for hunger-, poverty- and disease-prevention programs abroad. The letter writing campaign took place during the Rev. David Beckmann’s remarks on efforts to eliminate extreme poverty around the world. Beckmann is president of Bread for the World, which helps churches, individuals and organizations organize to change policies, programs and conditions that enable hunger to continue. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1470. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1183, 06/15/10.


The Rev. David Beckmann tells lay and clergy members attending the opening session of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event June 10 that miraculous strides have been made toward eliminating global hunger, but there’s much more to do. Worldwide, he said, 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 a day, and in the United States, nearly one in four children — 16.7 million — lives in a household that struggles to put food on the table. Beckmann is president of Bread for the World, which helps churches, individuals and organizations organize to change policies, programs and conditions that enable hunger to continue. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1469. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1183, 06/15/10.



Todd Spear, a member at Seminole Heights United Methodist Church in Tampa, looks through materials on the United Methodist Committee on Relief’s One-Ton Challenge and other social justice initiatives at a class on salty service to the world. It was one of nine educational and informational sessions offered for laity and clergy June 9, a day before the official start of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event at the Lakeland Center. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1468. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1182, 06/14/10.







The answers members seek for transformation of themselves and their churches are not in Nashville, home of many denominational agencies, or Lakeland, headquarters of the Florida Conference administrative and ministry offices, the Rev. Dr. Jim Harnish, senior pastor at Hyde Park United Methodist Church in Tampa, tells participants during his class “Transformed Leaders for Transforming Congregations.” Instead, he says, help and hope for churches are in the local church. Harnish taught one of eight classes, along with a film and discussion on poverty, offered to lay and clergy June 9, a day before the official start of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event at the Lakeland Center. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1467. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1182, 06/14/10.


Gloria Cramer (front), a member at First United Methodist Church in Hobe Sound, and other participants take a survey on prayer before considering what prayer really means during the class “Making Prayer a Priority.” The Rev. Dr. Harold Lewis, director of Black Congregational Excellence for the Florida Conference, taught the session, which was one of eight, along with a film and discussion on poverty, offered to laity and clergy June 9, a day before the official start of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event at the Lakeland Center. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1466. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1182, 06/14/10.


In his class “Making Prayer a Priority,” the Rev. Dr. Harold Lewis tells participants prayer is not a way to impress God and others hearing a prayer. Instead, prayer is having a “love relationship” with God. The class was one of eight, along with a film and discussion on poverty, offered to laity and clergy June 9, a day before the official start of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event at the Lakeland Center. Lewis is director of Black Congregational Excellence for the Florida Conference. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1465. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1182, 06/14/10.




Florida Conference lay members wait to greet Florida Gov. Charlie Crist after his message during the laity session June 10 at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Crist, who was the guest speaker at the lay gathering, is a member of First United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg, where his family has worshipped for five generations. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1464. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1181, 06/12/10.








Members thank Florida Gov. Charlie Crist for sharing personal details about his life and faith during the laity session June 10 at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event. Crist is a member of First United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg, where his family has worshipped for five generations. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo by Angie Bechanan. Photo #10-1463. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1181, 06/12/10.


Florida Gov. Charlie Crist told hundreds of members attending the laity session June 10 at the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event that he appreciated the opportunity to talk about his faith, something he is not often able to do. “Lessons I was taught by my family and church have stuck with me all these years,” he said, adding that throughout his time in public service he has always tried to use those lessons to do what is right. Crist is a member of First United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg, where his family has worshipped for five generations. Photo by Dave Summerill. Photo #10-1462. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1181, 06/12/10.


Children in cribs are placed under makeshift tents at Grace Children’s Hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after the earthquake, which damaged hospital buildings. The hospital is the flagship ministry of International Child Care, of which the Rev. Lynne Austin is a board member. Austin, now an elder in the California-Pacific Conference of The United Methodist Church, grew up in Central Florida, attending First United Methodist Church in Winter Park. She will help kick off “reBuild Haiti” June 13, a multi-church project of the Florida Conference’s East Central District. Photo courtesy of the Rev. Lynne Austin. Photo #10-1461. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1179, 06/08/10.








The Rev. Lynne Austin spends time with a child at Grace Children’s Hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the flagship ministry of International Child Care, of which Austin is a board member. Austin, now an elder in the California-Pacific Conference of The United Methodist Church, grew up in Central Florida, attending First United Methodist Church in Winter Park. She will help kick off “reBuild Haiti” June 13, a multi-church project of the Florida Conference’s East Central District. Photo courtesy of First United Methodist Church in Winter Park. Photo #10-1460. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1179, 06/08/10.


Many Haitians are still living in tent cities after their homes were damaged or destroyed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. It’s a growing concern now that the Atlantic hurricane season has begun. Photo by Bill Harley. Photo #10-1459. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10.











Sunny Wilmot (right) works with Catherine Bruno, 12, as she completes her application for temporary protected status at an immigration clinic sponsored by the Florida Conference Justice For Our Neighbors ministry at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando. File photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1440. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1172, 05/12/10. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10.




Bill Harley says many of the children he and other Florida Conference leaders met while visiting damaged areas of Haiti in February were smiling, despite having endured great loss. “At the heart, they are still kids. They like to be hugged, they like to be held, they like to kick a ball around,” he said. “In many ways, these kids are happy kids.” Photo by Phil Roughton. Photo #10-1458. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10.


Madame Paul gives a medicine-sized cup portion of strawberry soda to some of the 97 children she and three other women care for in a house Paul rents. It is one of several orphanages a group of Florida Conference leaders visited during a trip to Haiti in February that hopes to become part of the Global Orphan Project network, which helps build communities that sustain orphans around the world. Photo by Vee Stepelton. Photo #10-1457. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10.





Churches like this one in Haiti will be rebuilt in part with funds from the Florida Conference. Leaders from the Florida Conference gave the United Methodist Church of Haiti a $125,000 contribution during a visit to the Caribbean nation in February. The money will help pay pastors’ salaries and cover the cost of supplies needed to rebuild many churches that were damaged or destroyed during the Jan. 12 earthquake. Photo by Bill Harley. Photo #10-1456. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10.



The Rev. Beth Fogle-Miller, director of Florida Conference Connectional Ministries, gets to know some of the children at an orphanage near Port-au-Prince during a trip to Haiti in February with other conference and church leaders. Photo by Phil Roughton. Photo #10-1455. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1178, 06/03/10.





First United Methodist Church in Punta Gorda provided ice, food, water and hot meals to residents after Hurricane Charley hit the area in 2004. While crews worked to repair damage to the sanctuary and other church buildings caused by the storm, volunteers unloaded trucks of food and trunks filled with ice and distributed both to people in the community affected by the Category 4 hurricane. File photo by Michael Wacht. Photo #04-0080. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #0149, 08/25/08. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1177, 06/01/10.



Trinity United Methodist Church in Arcadia was one of many buildings and homes damaged during Hurricane Charley in 2004. It was also a point of operations for relief to the area, with church members providing food and water to residents affected by the storm. Arcadia is 20 to 30 miles from Port Charlotte, where the hurricane made landfall. File photo by the Rev. Dr. Larry Rankin. Photo #04-0062. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #0138, 08/14/08. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1177, 06/01/10.



A structural engineer consultant retained by the Florida Conference Ministry Protection department inspects the remains of Branches United Methodist Mission in Florida City after a fire ripped through the church’s main building and playground area May 23. Photo by Mark Thomas. Photo #10-1454. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1176, 05/28/10.









Members worship by the bell tower at Branches United Methodist Mission in Florida City May 23 after a fire that destroyed the church’s main building just hours before. Photo by Megan McCarty. Photo #10-1453. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1176, 05/28/10.



Structural engineers say the main church building at Branches United Methodist Mission is a total loss after an early morning fire May 23. The playground behind the church may only be a partial loss. Photo by Megan McCarty. Photo #10-1452. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1176, 05/28/10.


A fire burns the main church building at Branches United Methodist Mission in Florida City during the early morning hours May 23. Photo by Megan McCarty. Photo #10-1451. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1176, 05/28/10.






With the end of 30 years of civil war and the rebuilding of the country, hope is returning to Quéssua — the theological and spiritual center of the East Angola Conference of The United Methodist Church — and Angola. Photo by Barrie Wilke. Photo #10-1450. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.


A group of students from Santiago United Methodist Church in Luanda, Angola, takes pictures of their friends and members of a mission team from Harvest United Methodist Church in Bradenton. The students were visiting Quéssua — the theological and spiritual center of the East Angola Conference of The United Methodist Church and the base of operations for the mission team — for a retreat and hike to a cross topping a mountain that overlooks Quéssua and Malange. “They sang to welcome us, and then they took photos of us, ‘the missionaries from America,’ ” said Mike Kennedy, a member of the mission team. “It was wonderful and heartwarming, actually overwhelming.” The mission team visited in February and worked at Malange Central United Methodist Church, which has a relationship with the Florida church as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership. Photo by Barrie Wilke. Photo #10-1449. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.


Shelby Price gets to know 5-year-old Gabi while working with other members of her church, Harvest United Methodist Church in Bradenton, at the Internato Feminina, a girls boarding school adjacent to Malange Central United Methodist Church in Angola. Gabi lives with his 15-year-old sister, Quinha, and 22 other girls at the boarding school. “His love for everyone and his huge smile are clearly evident to all,” said the Rev. Catherine Fluck-Price, Shelby’s mom and co-pastor of the Florida church. “We all fell in love with him.” The Prices were part of a mission team from the Florida church, which has a relationship with the Malange church as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership. Photo by Barrie Wilke. Photo #10-1448. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.






Children at Malange Central United Methodist Church in Angola draw and color during a vacation Bible school led by members of Harvest United Methodist Church in Bradenton as part of a mission trip to Angola in February. The Rev. Catherine Fluck-Price, who serves as co-pastor of the Florida church, said many of the kids had never used crayons before then. The Florida church has a relationship with the east Angolan church as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership. Photo by Barrie Wilke. Photo #10-1447. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.


Members of Harvest United Methodist Church in Bradenton caulk windows at a girls boarding school adjacent to Malange Central United Methodist Church in Angola. The Florida church, which has a relationship with the Angolan church as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership, sent a mission team to the area in February. Photo by Barrie Wilke. Photo #10-1446. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.




Members of a mission team from Harvest United Methodist Church in Bradenton visiting Angola as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership toured Quéssua — the theological and spiritual center of the East Angola Conference of The United Methodist Church — and saw firsthand the damage caused by three decades of civil war in the remains of what was a middle school, chapel, home for missionaries and other ruins. A number of structures have been rebuilt, however, including Quéssua United Methodist Church and the site’s theological school, through the partnership. The visiting team continued that work, painting and repairing a boys boarding house. Photo by Barrie Wilke. Photo #10-1445. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.


Adilson, a student at the boys boarding school at Quéssua, recuperates after being hospitalized for malaria under a mosquito net provided by members of a Florida Conference mission team visiting the Quéssua complex in January. Members of the team hope the new nets they gave Adilson and the other boys will help them stay healthy for the remainder of their time at the boarding school. Quéssua is the theological and spiritual center of the East Angola Conference of The United Methodist Church and the temporary home of the Rev. Dr. Armando and Icel Rodriguez, who have been serving as short-term missioners in East Angola since September as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership. Photo by Rev. Dr. Armando Rodriguez Jr. Photo #10-1444. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.



The Rev. Dr. Armando and Icel Rodriguez (center)and students from the boys boarding school at Quéssua sit at the base of a cross that tops a mountain overlooking Quéssua and Malange. The crew hiked to the spot for worship and Bible study. The couple, along with their daughter Amanda, has been serving at Quéssua — the theological and spiritual center of the East Angola Conference of The United Methodist Church — as short-term missioners since September as part of the East Angola/Florida Partnership. They return to Florida in July. Armando is a Florida Conference elder, and Icel is director of the conference’s global mission ministry. Photo courtesy of the Rev. Dr. Armando Rodriguez Jr. Photo #10-1443. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1174, 05/24/10.


In addition to helping clients complete their paperwork to apply for temporary protected status at a Florida Conference Justice For Our Neighbors immigration clinic in February at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando, the Rev. Thomas Touissant (left) also translated much of the information on a seven-page immigration form for the group. The form is in English; the primary language spoken by many who attended is Creole. Touissant is pastor at Berea Haitian Mission in the Pine Hills area of Orlando. The clinic was held to help Haitians in Central Florida apply for the temporary status, which was granted by the U.S. government after the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti. The status enables Haitians to remain in the country and work for at least 18 months without fear of being deported. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1442. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1172, 05/12/10.





Mayuris Pimentel explains a question on the form to apply for temporary protected status to the Rev. Eliantus Valmyr, pastor of Emmanuel United Methodist Haitian Mission in Orlando, and a group of Haitians attending a Florida Conference Justice For Our Neighbors Immigration clinic in early February at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando. Pimentel is supervising attorney for Justice For Our Neighbors. The clinic was held to help Haitians in Central Florida apply for the temporary status, which was granted by the U.S. government after the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti. The status enables Haitians to remain in the country and work for at least 18 months without fear of being deported. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1441. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1172, 05/12/10.



Sunny Wilmot (right) works with Catherine Bruno, 12, as she completes her application for temporary protected status at a Florida Conference Justice For Our Neighbors immigration clinic in February at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando. Bruno’s 14-year-old brother Jeddy and mother applied for both the temporary status and authorization to work, which is given to people between the ages of 14 and 65. The clinic was held to help Haitians in Central Florida apply for the temporary status, which was granted by the U.S. government after the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti. The status enables Haitians to remain in the country and work for at least 18 months without fear of being deported. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1440. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1172, 05/12/10.


Although, she’s an attorney, Scharome Deaton (left) says understanding the paperwork and process of helping Haitian nationals, like Fezane Bruno (right), gain temporary protected status is difficult. Deaton was a volunteer at a Florida Conference Justice For Our Neighbors immigration clinic in February at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando. The clinic was held to help Haitians in Central Florida apply for the temporary status, which was granted by the U.S. government after the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti. The status enables Haitians to remain in the country and work for at least 18 months without fear of being deported. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1439. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1172, 05/12/10.


Michael Mills (left) helps a client complete his application for temporary protected status at a Florida Conference Justice For Our Neighbors immigration clinic in February at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Orlando. Mills is a member of Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Eatonville and a local attorney. The clinic was held to help Haitians in Central Florida apply for the temporary status, which was granted by the U.S. government after the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti. The status enables Haitians to remain in the country and work for at least 18 months without fear of being deported. Photo by Tita Parham. Photo #10-1438. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1172, 05/12/10.



A Haitian congregant of St. Martin Methodist Church in Port-au-Prince prays during an outdoor worship service. A UMNS photo by Mike DuBose. Photo #10-1394. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1135, 02/03/10. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1171, 05/11/10.


Signs requesting help were a common sight in damaged areas of Port-au-Prince after the earthquake. A UMNS photo by Mike Dubose. Photo #10-1392. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1135, 02/03/10. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1171, 05/11/10.




While visiting Carrenage, Haiti, in October 2008, team members from First United Methodist Church in Homosassa Springs were able to spend time getting to know area schoolchildren. File photo courtesy of Patience Nave. Photo #09-1082. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #0961, 1/12/09. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1171, 05/11/10.


A crucifix stands amid the rubble of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A UMNS photo by Mike DuBose. Photo #10-1437. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1171, 05/11/10.





The Rev. Lyndol Loyd, co-leads The Methodist Way class on intentional discipling before the 2008 Florida Annual Conference Event. He stressed that churches can no longer assume the people they are trying to reach have any level of biblical knowledge. File photo by Greg Moore. Photo #08-0860. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #0859, 05/29/08. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1169, 05/05/10.







The Rev. Harold Lewis talks with attendees about the importance of churches developing a vision all members can learn and embrace during a workshop titled “Do You See What I See?” Lewis is the director of Florida Conference Black Congregational Development. His workshop was one of eight offered before the 2009 Florida Annual Conference Event. File photo by Caryl Kelley. Photo #09-1200. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1030, 06/11/09. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1169, 05/05/10.


The current Florida Conference Center in Lakeland was built in 1969. File photo by Caryl Kelley. Photo #08-1056. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #0937, 11/05/08. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1168, 05/04/10.





The new Florida United Methodist Conference Center, still under construction, is located at 450 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue across from Lake Wire in downtown Lakeland. The expected move-in date is June 16. Photo by Frank North. Photo #10-1436. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1168, 05/04/10.


Bishop Gregory Palmer (right), chairperson of the Call To Action Committee, shares thoughts with consultants Mark Harrison and Frederick Miller during the group’s April 6-8 meeting in Nashville, Tenn. The 12-member committee is a successor to an earlier group appointed by the Council of Bishops to reorder the life of The United Methodist Church for greater effectiveness and vitality in “making disciples for Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world” and addressing the Four Areas of Focus endorsed by the 2008 General Conference. A UMNS photo by Rich Peck. Photo #10-1435. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1167, 04/28/10.


The Rev. Larry Hollon (center), top staff executive of United Methodist Communications, tells the Call to Action Committee that 85 percent of non-Christians view Christianity as a hypocritical faith, as do 52 percent of those within the faith. Speaking at the committee’s April 6-8 meeting in Nashville, Tenn., he also said the Pew Forum found that 83 percent of youngsters keep their cell phones next to their beds. “We are in a post-Web page era,” he said, noting that Web sites are being supplanted by social media and text messaging. A UMNS photo by Rich Peck. Photo #10-1434. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1167, 04/28/10.






Africa University offers graduate and undergraduate degrees in six areas — agriculture and natural resources, education, humanities and social sciences, health sciences, management and administration, and theology. It also offers an information technology training center and a certificate program in medical laboratory technology. Its Institute of Peace, Leadership and Governance offers postgraduate diplomas and master’s programs. Representatives of Africa University visited 17 United Methodist churches in three North Florida districts in March to thank Florida United Methodists for their support and raise money toward a $20 million goal. Photo courtesy of Africa University. Photo #10-1433. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1166, 04/27/10.


When Africa University opened in 1992, 44 students studied in renovated farm buildings on the current 1,500-care site in Old Mutare, Zimbabwe. Since then, more than 3,000 students have graduated from the university in its 18-year history. Representatives of Africa University visited 17 United Methodist churches in three North Florida districts in March to thank Florida United Methodists for their support and raise money toward a $20 million goal. Photo courtesy of Africa University. Photo #10-1432. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1166, 04/27/10.





Africa University’s choir received first place for the 2006 National Arts Merit Award, given annually by the National Arts Council of Zimbabwe in recognition of outstanding achievements in the performing arts. The choir’s main function is to sing in weekly chapel services, leading the congregation in worship, but it also performs throughout the country and has annually toured the United States. Representatives of Africa University visited 17 United Methodist churches in three North Florida districts in March to thank Florida United Methodists for their support and raise money toward a $20 million goal. Photo by Don Wood. Photo #10-1431. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1166, 04/27/10.


Africa University’s Kwang Lim Chapel is one of the first buildings students and visitors see as they make their way up the university’s long drive to the 1,500-acre campus in Old Mutare, Zimbabwe. The chapel was built in 1996 with funding from Kwang Lim Methodist Church in Seoul, Korea, and reflects both Korean and African art. Representatives of Africa University visited 17 United Methodist churches in three North Florida districts in March to thank Florida United Methodists for their support and raise money toward a $20 million goal. Photo courtesy of Africa University. Photo #10-1430. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1166, 04/27/10.



What’s an education at Africa University worth? Elaine Jenkins (left) and the Rev. Yollande Samba Mavund can explain it, but from different perspectives. Jenkins is director of planned giving for the university, and Mavund is a graduate. Both women shared aspects of Africa University’s mission and story with members and guests at Stewart Memorial United Methodist Church in Daytona Beach March 21. Their visit was one of 17 representatives of the university made to North Florida churches to thank United Methodists for their past support and raise awareness about the university’s future needs. Photo by Kitty Carpenter. Photo #10-1429. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1166, 04/27/10.


Workers harvest tomatoes at a farm in Immokalee, Fla., where low wages and poor conditions prompted farm worker advocates to lobby fast-food giant Burger King Corp. An agreement in 2008 between Burger King and farm workers increased wages and protection to workers subjected to abuse from growers. A UMNS file photo by Scott Robertson. Photo #08-0893. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #0867, 06/12/08. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1165, 04/23/10.











Kelly Varsames, a member of Hyde Park United Methodist Church in Tampa, gives her e-mail address to Coalition of Immokalee Workers and Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida after viewing the Modern-Day Slavery Museum, a traveling museum depicting the harsh realities migrant farm workers face. “I like to be able to help organizations by signing online petitions,” she said. The museum is a joint effort between the Coalition and Interfaith Action. It kicked off its tour Feb. 28 at Grace United Methodist Church in Cape Coral and stopped at the Tampa church April 11. Photo by J.A. Buchholz. Photo #10-1428. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1165, 04/23/10.









Sean Sellers, a Kellogg Food and Society Fellow, takes members of Hyde Park United Methodist Church in Tampa through the Modern-Day Slavery Museum. The traveling museum is a joint effort between the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida that depicts the harsh realities and living conditions migrant farm workers face. The museum kicked off its tour Feb. 28 at Grace United Methodist Church in Cape Coral and stopped at the Tampa church April 11. The box truck housing the museum is similar to one in which workers were held captive; they were released from it only to pick tomatoes. Photo by J.A. Buchholz. Photo #10-1427. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1165, 04/23/10.


Wilson Perez hoists a typical 32-pound bucket of tomatoes at Hyde Park United Methodist Church in Tampa April 11. Perez works 10-12 hours a day picking tomatoes. In 1978 workers earned just 40 cents per bucket. Today, the rate is 72 cents. Perez traveled throughout Florida Feb. 28-April 18 with the Modern-Day Slavery Museum to bring attention to the plight of migrant farm workers. The museum is a joint effort between the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida that depicts the harsh realities and living conditions migrant farm workers face. Photo by J.A. Buchholz. Photo #10-1426. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1165, 04/23/10.


Visitors tour the Modern-Day Slavery Museum Feb. 28 at Grace United Methodist Church in Cape Coral. The traveling museum is a joint effort between the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida that depicts the harsh realities and living conditions migrant farm workers face. The tour culminated April 18 with a march that took workers and advocates through Tampa, Plant City and their final stop in Lakeland. Photo by Brigitte Gynther. Photo #10-1425. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1165, 04/23/10.





At a multi-lingual Lay Speaking Ministries training event, participants see how drama, music, personal witness and symbolic acts can communicate the gospel. Jenny Andrews, a member of First United Methodist Church in Madison, recalls how Mary anointed Jesus’ feet with perfume. File photo by Michael Wacht. Originally accompanied “Florida holds first multi-language Lay Speaking event,” 04/13/01, Florida United Methodist Review. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1164, 04/22/10.








A woman picks up one of more than 200 pairs of shoes that were given to homeless individuals and families at Hope Central in Fort Lauderdale during a weekend event sponsored by Christ Church United Methodist. The church canceled its worship services so members could instead participate in salty service projects. The ministry and church work together to offer worship, food, a day care and other services for the area’s homeless population. File photo by Erik J. Alsgaard. Photo #09-1240. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1042, 07/08/09. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1161, 04/07/10.


Dr. Laurel Kearns says the world is not like a globe, with countries defined by lines and colors. As a result, any harm done environmentally in one area affects the areas around it and well beyond. Kearns is associate professor of Sociology of Religion and Environmental Studies at Drew Theological School in Madison, N.J. The Florida native was the keynote speaker during the opening session of the 2009 Florida Annual Conference Event at Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach. File photo by Greg Moore. Photo #09-1207. Originally accompanied e-Review Florida UMNS #1033, 06/13/09. Also accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1161, 04/07/10.

 


In his office at the episcopal building in Lakeland, Florida Conference Bishop Timothy Whitaker says he is hopeful the theme of the 2010 Florida Annual Conference Event — “Transforming the World by Eradicating Extreme Poverty” — will encourage churches to look intentionally at how their ministries are alleviating or eliminating poverty and embrace that “as part of Christ’s call to the church and to the world.” Photo by Derek Maul. Photo #10-1424. Accompanies e-Review Florida UMNS #1161, 04/07/10.







Contact Us

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(863) 688-5563 or toll free (800) 282-8011